Tuesday, July 13, 2010

RIP George Steinbrenner


The Boss (the other The Boss) looms large as a figure in my nascent sports fandom; as a kid in Ft. Lauderdale we had season tickets to Yankees spring training games. This is probably from 76-79, pretty good years to be seeing the Yankees. You could wait by the players' parking lot, surrounded by a flimsy chain-link fence, and get Mickey Rivers' (favorite Yankee) or Willie Randolph's autograph after the game. I read the box scores in the paper each morning, and remember where i was when i watched Bucky Dent beat the Red Sox in the one-game playoff one afternoon after school. During this time period Steinbrenner was in the news almost as much as the players it seemed, and my dad thought the back and forth between him and Billy Martin, with the hirings and firings, was hilarious. He seemed to soften in his old age (Torre managed there forever, compared to his predecessors), maybe he just wasn't around as much. But he was such a character that despite the fact that he was such a hot-head and a meddling jerk of an owner much of the time, it was hard not to feel some affection for someone so emotionally involved in owning a baseball team. Then again, i never had to play for him.

3 Comments:

Blogger dave said...

I agree, he always kind of made everything more interesting. Mickey Rivers was my favorite player too.

8:58 PM  
Blogger Ben said...

As a Red Sox fan, he was so much fun to hate and made the rivalry so much more fun and intense. Hard to believe I'm saying this, but his presence & personality will be missed.
On a completely unrelated note, have to get something off my chest. Jon's final comments on p. 228 in Our Noise about how Superchunk will be remembered for not what they did, but how they did it, and how it's how just the two people who put our the Arcade Fire records, etc...just could not disagree any more vehemently with this sentiment. Not to take anything away from how the music was made, recorded, distributed, marketed, and supported (which I have great respect & appreciation for), but the statement, to me at least, really belittles the quality of the music...it's WHAT Superchunk made - the songs and the countless perfect moments of greatness within them - that will keep me and many others coming back to these records again and again for years to come. Now I feel better...thanks. Looking forward to more great moments on the next record. "Learned to Surf" gives me really high hopes.

8:54 PM  
Blogger Ben said...

As a Red Sox fan, he was so much fun to hate and made the rivalry so much more fun and intense. Hard to believe I'm saying this, but his presence & personality will be missed.
On a completely unrelated note, have to get something off my chest. Jon's final comments on p. 228 in Our Noise about how Superchunk will be remembered for not what they did, but how they did it, and how it's how just the two people who put our the Arcade Fire records, etc...just could not disagree any more vehemently with this sentiment. Not to take anything away from how the music was made, recorded, distributed, marketed, and supported (which I have great respect & appreciation for), but the statement, to me at least, really belittles the quality of the music...it's WHAT Superchunk made - the songs and the countless perfect moments of greatness within them - that will keep me and many others coming back to these records again and again for years to come. Now I feel better...thanks. Looking forward to more great moments on the next record. "Learned to Surf" gives me really high hopes.

8:58 PM  

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